May 3, 2024

FINAL COHORT OF PAST THE PANDEMIC starts May 23

After 21 cohorts since July 2020 and more than 1,000 participants, Past the Pandemic’s last cohort starts May 23. This six-week ECHO series offers providers and

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After 21 cohorts since July 2020 and more than 1,000 participants, Past the Pandemic’s last cohort starts May 23.

This six-week ECHO series offers providers and other staff working in health care and public health settings an opportunity to navigate, normalize and validate worries, stressors and experiences related to various health care environments. Each session provides helpful, tangible tools in a psychoeducational, didactic format to increase capacity, mitigate burnout, elevate connectedness and mindfulness, and promote self-efficacy and quality patient care. Offered in partnership with CU School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry. Read more and sign up.

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May 1, 2024

UROLOGY ECHO ADDRESSES NATIONWIDE UROLOGIST SHORTAGE AND HEALTH CARE DISPARITY IN RURAL COMMUNITIES

The U.S. is facing an overall shortage of physicians, at least half of which is among specialty medicine physicians such as urologists. The declining urology workforce

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The U.S. is facing an overall shortage of physicians, at least half of which is among specialty medicine physicians such as urologists. The declining urology workforce in the U.S. is at risk of primarily threatening access to care in rural communities. According to the American Urological Association’s (AUA) census report, in 2022 only 20.1 percent of urologists in the U.S. practiced in designated nonmetropolitan areas (defined as a population size less than 50,000). From another view, only 37 percent of all counties nationally were identified as having a practicing urologist. (AUA News, Urology Workforce Trends and Impact on Rural Practice)

This situation is also a disparity matter. Patients in rural communities are commonly older, poorer, sicker and more remote from health care services than patients in urban areas. The relative lack of a urological workforce in these communities contributes to health care disparity.

ECHO Colorado and University of Colorado School of Medicine Division of Urology started offering the urology ECHO in September 2022 to address the need for increased access to specialized knowledge and support for patients with urologic conditions, focusing on underserved patient populations and rural areas. The Urology ECHO program aims to mitigate the effects of the workforce shortage, preserve access to appropriate and timely urologic care, and expand access to care by expanding the knowledge base of primary care physicians and providers.

“The other faculty presenters and I greatly enjoy the interactive nature of the sessions,” said Janine Oliver, MD, FPMRS, lead ECHO partner; co-director, Anschutz Medical Campus Urogynecology Multidisiplinary Clinic; and assistant professor, CU School of Medicine Division of Urology. “The ECHO platform is engaging, and it is rewarding to hear and share experiences with our physician and APP colleagues in primary care. We love hearing the feedback from the participants about how the ECHO sessions have led to knowledge gains and directly had an impact on quality and access to care by changes in their practices.”

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Apr 30, 2024

PMCC Receives Funding to Expand eConsults in Rural Colorado

The University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Peer Mentored Care Collaborative (PMCC) is one of three projects championed by members of the Colorado congressional delegation to

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The University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Peer Mentored Care Collaborative (PMCC) is one of three projects championed by members of the Colorado congressional delegation to receive Congressionally Directed Spending/Community Project Funding in 2024. Funding for the CU Anschutz Rural eConsults Expansion Project was led by Rep. Crow and Sens. Bennet and Hickenlooper, and will increase the availability of specialty care in rural Colorado, improving wait times and promoting an innovative approach to improving patient access to specialty care. The project will put to use innovative technology and data-informed clinical decision support to assist local providers in treating more patients locally. Investing in rural telemedicine software will improve health outcomes, increase the satisfaction of providers, and improve the life and well-being of rural residents. Learn more about PMCC here.

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Apr 2, 2024

ECHO COLORADO AT CASCHEW 2024: COLLABORATION IS CRITICAL

ECHO Colorado was excited to support the CASCHEW 2024 Conference in March, in partnership with CO-CEAL and SNOCAP. A big thank you to our presenters and

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ECHO Colorado was excited to support the CASCHEW 2024 Conference in March, in partnership with CO-CEAL and SNOCAP. A big thank you to our presenters and partners who came out to learn from each other and collaborate. Collaborating Across Sectors for Colorado’s Health Equity and Wellness (CASCHEW) 2024 brought together over 100 project participants, community partners, community members, public health departments/organizations, clinic staff, primary care clinicians and medical and academic partners committed to improving the health of all Coloradans.

Devin Miller, MPH, PMCC director of operations, was part of the planning committee and she presented with partners from HCPF and CDPHE on how to successfully conduct cross-sector collaboration to address medical and public health challenges. “Cross-sector collaboration is critical because it leverages diverse expertise and resources to address complex challenges more effectively than any single organization could achieve alone,” said Miller.

BreAnna Teeters, MPH, ECHO project coordinator; David Saxon, MD, PMCC medical director; and Melissa Griffith, MD, rheumatology ECHO partner, presented Keeping Care Local: eConsults and ECHOs in Rural and Frontier Counties. They presented on the scope of the work that’s being done to analyze eConsult and ECHO program data to understand educational needs in Colorado’s health care communities.

“My main takeaway from the conference,” said Teeters, “is that our work shouldn’t and can’t be siloed because there are opportunities that could be missed when we are trying to build something from scratch; working with others better supports work that’s already been started.”

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